Report Building Tips for complying with Pre-Purchase inspection building standards

So you’ve opened up your copy of the Pre-Purchase building inspection standards and you’re stumped. We’re here to help.

 

Just a quick note- we use the word house to refer to what the standards call residential buildings. So, for example, where we say ‘house’ that would include apartments.

It goes without saying that this isn’t legal advice or a complete guide on how to comply with these standards- just a few helpful reminders to assist in your reading of the standards, and to jog your memory so you don’t make some common mistakes.

Tips for complying with Pre-Purchase inspection building standards

 

So you’ve opened up your copy of the Pre-Purchase building inspection standards and you’re stumped. When it comes to report building, we’re here to help.

 

Just a quick note- we use the word house to refer to what the standards call residential buildings. So, for example, where we say ‘house’ that would include apartments.

It goes without saying that this isn’t legal advice or a complete guide on how to comply with these standards- just a few helpful reminders to assist in your reading of the standards, and to jog your memory so you don’t make some common mistakes.

 

  1. Always have a written contract. The written contract should be clear, comprehensive and written with regards to the standards- you might want to get the help of a solicitor in drafting a standard contract.
  2. Remember, the general purpose of an inspection is to A) Detect major defects and B) Provide a general report on the condition of the building based on a visual inspection of accessible areas of the building. A major defect is “A defect of sufficient magnitude where rectification has to be carried out in order to avoid unsafe conditions, loss of utility or further deterioration of the property.” A minor defect is any other defect.
  3. Remember that when you’re just inspecting for structural problems, the rules are different. Appendix A deals with this.
  4. Always discuss with clients beforehand areas you cannot reach for a visual inspection, or which you anticipate you might not be able to reach.
  5. It may not be enough to simply inspect the building, the rules state you have to inspect all relevant features of the property within 30 meters of the property. According to the standards, relevant features include:

“car accommodation, detached laundry, ablution facilities and garden sheds, retaining walls more than 700 mm high, paths and driveways, steps, fencing, earth embankments, surface water drainage and stormwater run-off.”

  1. Where possible, you should inspect the following areas of the house:

“(a) The interior of the building.

(b) The roof space.

(c) The exterior of the building.

(d) The sub-floor space.

(e) The roof exterior.

(f) The property within 30 m of the building subject to inspection.”

  1. Where you are inspecting Strata and Company Title residential property remember, you only have to inspect the house- not the common areas.
  2. Protect yourself! You don’t have to inspect everything that’s high up, only inspect if-

You can safely and reasonably access the area OR

an unobstructed line of sight is present from safe use of a 3.6 m ladder and the

building elements present are close enough to allow appraisal.

  1. There are detailed descriptions of what counts as safe and reasonable access in the standards- use them.
  2. Here is a summary of the table of categories of problem or damage from the standards- remember to refer to the table itself for more information:

A Damage

B Distortion

C Water penetration

D Material deterioration

E Operational  (something does not work like it is supposed to)

F Installations (Something has been installed inappropiately, or used inappropiately, or does not have the necessary parts)

  1. A report should contain:

“(a) Identity of the inspector undertaking the inspection.

(b) Identity of the client

(c) The address of the property inspected.

(d) Date of inspection.

(e) Weather conditions at the time of the inspection.

(f) Limitations of inspection with respect to accessible area.

(g) Observation of defects”

 

The rules regarding what should be in reports are quite complex and there is no shortcut to referring to the standards here. Our report building software package is based around automatically generating a report for you as soon as you have finished supplying it with all the details you find.

report building example

Report Building Software to Simplify Your Property Inspections

Market rates for pre-purchase building inspectors are very competitive. Given the number of jobs you have to do a week to keep up it’s not viable to go home and write an essay. We use report building software that allows us to prepare a report while we inspect the premises, simply entering what we observe as we go.

report building example

Need leads for pre-purchase building inspector jobs? Report Building is slowing you down? Not Anymore

It’s hard enough to find time to negogiate contracts, inspect premises, stay abreast of new rules and market yourself, all the while writing reports. Maybe pre-purchase inspection report building software can help you clear up more time on your schedule, without sacrificing valuable personal or family time.

Other Useful Sites for Property Inspection Report Information

  • www.diamondnet.com.au
    One of Australia’s leading Property Inspection Report services, with over 25 years experience and 250,000 reports.
  • www.sydneyprepurchase.com.au
    Sydney PrePurchase is a leading property inspection firm that guarantees to deliver a thorough and independent property inspection report
  • www.jimsbuildinginspections.com.au
    Jim’s Building Inspections Sydney. We service all of NSW with building inspection services. Fully insured with reports in 24 hours.
  • http://www.ybi.com.au/
    A building inspection report is different to a ‘pest inspection report’.
  • www.opr.com.au
    A professional, independent property inspection company servicing Sydney and regional NSW.